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Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

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RanchRoper
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by RanchRoper » Fri Feb 14, 2020 12:12 pm

Cool when hobbies and lifestyles mix together.
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by RanchRoper » Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:01 pm

Been watching a bunch of these videos today, very cool. I want to just live like that, except I might not be tough enough. And I'd be by myself because my wife couldn't watch Jeopardy there.


Canadian dealer has a good selection...assume percussion are the cap models.

https://marstar.ca/product-category/fir ... li-musket/

Also interesting is that the Cabelas Canada website sells Hawkens and says no firearms license required to purchase a flintlock.
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by PT7 » Sat Feb 15, 2020 12:32 am

RanchRoper wrote:
Fri Feb 14, 2020 8:01 pm
Been watching a bunch of these videos today, very cool. I want to just live like that, except I might not be tough enough. ~~~ Also interesting is that the Cabelas Canada website sells Hawkens and says no firearms license required to purchase a flintlock.
I'd say you have a "head start" on that lifestyle, RR. You spend a lot of time on horseback, outside in not the friendliest climate. There surely is some toughness already there from those years' experiences.

As I watched the video I posted, the Montana club shot only flintlock rifles. Most of those folk seemed to really have their guns shooting well. I've never shot a flintlock (Al has), but from what I've read and seen at my BP range is that it appears to take more time to learn how to use that lock. I chose to start with a percussion firearm, which was recommended to me as simpler to learn. I like it. Maybe sometime I'll get to shoot a flintlock.

Can you also get a percussion model in Canada without a firearms license as allowed for the flintlock? I was pleased that when I bought my Trapper it came directly to my front door without any paperwork required to be filed. A very nice surprise....an easy and enjoyable purchase. Shooting BP for me, as you know, has been a great change of pace, which I really like.

Sure glad you've enjoyed viewing some of those videos. They are cool 8-) .
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by dave77 » Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:12 am

Back when I was shooting black powder I got to shoot a friend's flintlock several times. Definitely more of a challenge than a percussion cap rifle, you really have to concentrate on holding on the target after pulling the trigger, there is a noticeable wait for the main powder charge to go off.
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by PT7 » Sat Feb 15, 2020 8:59 am

dave77 wrote:
Sat Feb 15, 2020 4:12 am
Back when I was shooting black powder I got to shoot a friend's flintlock several times. Definitely more of a challenge than a percussion cap rifle, you really have to concentrate on holding on the target after pulling the trigger, there is a noticeable wait for the main powder charge to go off.
Good point, Dave. That was very noticeable in the video. When you shot your friend's flintlock, were you aware of the "flash" in front of your eyes when the powder ignited? Seems to me that it would make "holding on the target" even more of a challenge. Either that, or it happens so quickly it just might be negligible. As I noted earlier, the folk at the flintlock woods shoot for the most part handled their rifles well --- loading, aiming, firing. I would have liked to see some of the target results to get the full picture.
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by RanchRoper » Sat Feb 15, 2020 10:36 am

Need a license for percussion models. That's what I would prefer anyway.
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by dave77 » Sat Feb 15, 2020 2:03 pm

I don't remember the smoke from the pan being a big deal but it has been over 20 years since I shot it. Both my friend and a couple other guys were better shots with their flintlocks than I was with my percussion rifle although that was probably at least partly due to weight. My friend had a swamped barrel so was noticeably lighter and better balanced than my rifle. I started with a more modern, shorter BP rifle and was a better shot with it.

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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by dasmoeturhead » Mon Feb 17, 2020 3:50 pm

I imagine flintlocks are a bit more challenging than cap and ball. I'll stick with my percussion smoke pole. I need to get my old carcus to a Rendezvous soon. I wonder if my skins still fit. Hmmm might have to work on that belly.
I'd be solo like RanchRoper. For the same reason. Lol.
You definitely have to respect a flintlock shooter.
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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by mlrifleNY » Thu Feb 20, 2020 5:01 pm

Been shooting flintlocks for decades and hunted with them just as long. Used to shoot with the New York State flintlock team and had a ball. A good flintlock will not have a perceivable delay when fired, if it does it is not setup right. A lot of work goes into making one work right.

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Re: Wet flintlocks in Montana winter woods

Post by dasmoeturhead » Fri Feb 21, 2020 8:43 am

mlrifleNY wrote:
Thu Feb 20, 2020 5:01 pm
Been shooting flintlocks for decades and hunted with them just as long. Used to shoot with the New York State flintlock team and had a ball. A good flintlock will not have a perceivable delay when fired, if it does it is not setup right. A lot of work goes into making one work right.

Jim
I imagine it does. I've been deer hunting, and even after snapping off a few caps before loading, when a buck did come into view my rifle failed to ignite. I can see how a flintlock would be even harder, particularly on a hunt.
One must respect those men and women who's life depended on that rifle or musket to go off. We have it so easy now. That's one reason I hunt with a BP Rifle. It's a freaking challenge. It's hands on. Anybody can hunt or shoot a center bore rifle, and pretty much expect it to go Boom when you pull the trigger. Not so much with a Flintlock or BP Smoke pole. If all goes right, when I squeeze the trigger on ole' Bull Thrower, that animal is going down.
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